THE FIRST AND MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION IN GABON: "WHICH ETHNIC GROUP ARE YOU FROM"? LA PREMIÈRE ET PLUS IMPORTANTE QUESTION AU GABON: "QUELLE EST VOTRE ETHNIE?"



Palais de Justice de Libreville
Libreville's Courthouse


English version

The testimony given by the student: Edvin Ballack Obame, who was incarcerated with twenty other in the cells of the Directorate General of Research (DGR) of Gabon, is simply appalling and infuriating and demonstrates, if still needed, the ignobleness of those who govern us and lead us irreparably, if nothing is done, toward an inevitable social and even societal explosion.

Several international media outlets have indeed echoed the testimony of this brave gentleman who gives us, bluntly, the rendering of the treatment inflicted upon these young Gabonese students who, it must be remembered, have committed no crime and on whom weighs no charge; outside of the fallacious "disturbing public order" swayed by those who believe that they are the law.

These news agencies confirm that the group of about 20 students is locked in a cramped cell, in violation, he seems, of incarceration norms. We also learn that on June 11, the students held a general meeting to educate the student body about their legitimate demands. So far nothing special. Alerted of this meeting, the security forces raided the meeting and asked for its interruption. Given the refusal of the students, the security forces issued physical threats of arrests of so-called "leaders". Then students lined up quietly, preferring to be arrested rather than obey the orders of the security forces. Here is, dear readers, the nature of the crime committed by these students. They simply decided not to obey the security forces who asked them to interrupt their meeting. Where is freedom of association?

Dear readers, remember also that one cannot be arrested for disturbing the peace when one is calm, quietly talking with colleagues, inside the university campus whose franchises benefit from specific legal protections in almost all democratic countries of the world.

Selected pieces from the testimony of Edvin Ballack Obame

"When we got to the DGR, they asked us to undress. Me, I initially refused, then I was slapped and I received a big blow to the ear. When we told them that the Constitution prohibited this kind of abuse, the men responded by slapping us. Then they took us into a black hole, a cell where there was shit and urine on the walls and lots of mosquitoes."

"Each of us was interviewed individually. They asked each time the same questions: 'What ethnicity are you?', 'Who is behind you?' They wanted to know if we were Fang, because they think that we are sustained by Andre Mba Obame. We answered that we just wanted to affirm our rights as students. They also asked us to sign a report saying that our movement was ending at the university. None of us signed."

Those who support Ali Bongo, his regime and its methods, should just tell us what these students have done to deserve this barbaric treatment. Worse yet, the testimony of this brave student puts us face to face with the stripped nature of the regime; its irreducible and incurable commitment to tribalism. Here it is not even question whether or not these students are human beings, have parents, families. No, here it is about only one thing, their ethnicity. It's like in Rwanda during the genocide, where security forces stationed at roadblocks simply asked motorists: "Hutu or Tutsi?" We remind people that the security forces are supposed to be republican and not to engage in acts of exasperation of ethnic antagonism. When those who are supposed to protect the general population show clear signs of ethnic animosity, the country runs straight towards the precipice. If the content of this interview was just one isolated incident, of course we could understand and say that this exchange represents only these gendarmes and no other entity. But this is not the case, because the informed observer would notice that in Gabon, this type of extremely serious incidents of incitement to ethnic suspicion, are now common occurrences. This frequency deprives them of the character of isolated incidents, as it is now a series. When these incidents are in addition to other incidents, one can speak of an atmosphere that is maintained at the highest level of the state and the people responsible for that must be exposed in front of everyone, before this especially sickening atmosphere results in an open conflict.

When they arrest you, lead you into a filthy cell, physically assaults you by slaps punctuated with insults and ask you if you belong to a certain ethnic group; can you, dear readers, continue to believe in national unity as represented by the guaranteed protection you are supposed to receive from these same security forces? This blog thinks not! Finally, what do they want in Gabon? Where do they want to push people? Why do they want to force some Gabonese to exercise the utmost discretion with their legitimate claims? Why do they want to convince some Gabonese to keep their head down, hug the walls, be transparent and pay attention to their words? Why do they say with lengthy dithyrambs that national unity is their greatest legacy, while doing everything to destroy it? Where do those who have an hegemonic and unchallenged stranglehold on all powers in Gabon: political, economical, military, cultural and media, want to lead this country?

So goes Gabon and courage to the brave students who are giving us a lesson in perseverance and good citizenship.



Version française

Le témoignage livré par l'étudiant Edvin Ballack Obame, qui était incarcéré avec une vingtaine d'autres dans les geôles de la Direction Générale des Recherches (DGR) gabonaise, est tout simplement affligeant et rageant et démontre, si besoin encore était, de la bassesse de ceux qui nous gouvernent et nous mènent irrémédiablement, si rien n'est fait, vers une explosion sociale et même sociétale inévitable.

Plusieurs organes de presse internationaux ont en effet répercuté le témoignage de ce brave garçon qui nous donne, sans prendre de gants, le rendu du traitement infligé aux jeunes étudiants gabonais qui, faut-il le rappeler, n'ont commis aucun crime et sur lesquels, ne pèse aucun chef d'accusation; en dehors du fallacieux "trouble à l'ordre public" balancé par ceux qui estiment que la loi c'est eux.

Ces agences de presse confirment que la vingtaine d'étudiants est enfermée dans une cellule exigüe, en violation, nous semble t-il, des normes carcérales. Nous apprenons aussi que le 11 Juin dernier, ces étudiants tenaient une assemblée générale pour sensibiliser le corps étudiant à leurs revendications légitimes. Jusqu'ici rien de bien spécial. Alertés de cette réunion, les gendarmes ont fait irruption et demandé son interruption. Devant le refus des étudiants, les gendarmes sont passés à la menace physique d'arrestation des dits "meneurs". C'est ainsi que les étudiants ce sont calmement alignés, préférant se faire arrêter plutôt que d'obéir aux injonctions des gendarmes. Voici chers lecteurs, la nature du crime commis par ces étudiants. Ils ont tout simplement décidé de ne pas obéir aux gendarmes qui leur demandaient d'interrompre leur réunion. La liberté d'association est où?

Chers lecteurs, retenez aussi qu'on ne peut pas être arrêté pour trouble à l'ordre public alors qu'on est calme, paisiblement en train de discuter avec ses collègues, à l'intérieur du campus universitaire dont les franchises bénéficient de protections juridiques particulières dans presque tous les états démocratiques du monde.

Morceaux choisis du temoignage de Edvin Ballack Obame

"Quand nous sommes arrivés à la DGR, ils nous ont demandé de nous déshabiller. Moi, j’ai d’abord refusé, alors j’ai été giflé et j’ai reçu un gros coup à l’oreille. Quand on leur disait que la Constitution interdisait ce genre de mauvais traitements, les hommes répondaient par des gifles. Puis, ils nous ont emmenés dans un trou noir, une cellule où il y avait de la chiure et de l’urine sur les murs, et énormément de moustiques."

"Chacun de nous a été interrogé individuellement. Ils ont posé à chaque fois les mêmes questions: 'De quelle ethnie êtes-vous ?', 'Qui est derrière vous ?'. Ils voulaient savoir si on était fang, parce qu’ils pensent que nous sommes soutenus par André Mba Obame. Nous, on répondait qu’on voulait simplement revendiquer nos droits d’étudiants. Ils nous ont aussi demandé de signer un procès-verbal disant qu’on mettait fin à notre mouvement à l’université. Aucun d’entre nous n’a signé."

Que ceux qui soutiennent Ali Bongo, son régime et ses méthodes, viennent nous dire en quoi ces étudiants méritent-ils ce traitement barbare. Plus grave encore, le témoignage de ce brave étudiant nous met face à face avec la nature dépouillée du régime; son irréductible et incurable attachement au tribalisme. Ici il n'est même pas question de savoir si oui ou si non ces étudiants sont des êtres humains, ont des parents, des familles. Non, ici il n'est question que d'une chose, de leur appartenance ethnique. On se croirait au Rwanda pendant le génocide, où les forces de sécurité postées à des barrages routiers demandaient simplement aux automobilistes: "Hutu ou Tutsi?" Nous rappelons que les forces de sécurité sont supposées être républicaines et ne pas s'engager à des actes d'exaspération d'antagonismes ethniques. Quand ceux qui sont supposés protéger l'ensemble de la population démontrent des signes évidents d'animosité ethnique, le pays court tout droit vers le précipice. Si le contenu de cet interrogatoire ne représentait qu'un incident isolé, bien sûr qu'on pourrait comprendre et se dire que cet échange ne représente que ces gendarmes et nulle autre entité. Mais ce n'est pas le cas, car l'observateur averti remarquerait qu'au Gabon, ce type d'incidents extrêmement graves d'incitation à la suspicion ethnique, sont désormais suivis d’autres événements tout aussi graves. Ce qui leur enlève le caractère d'incidents isolés, car c’est désormais toute une série qui s’enclenche. Quand ces incidents viennent s’ajouter à d'autres incidents, on peut parler d’une atmosphère qui est entretenue au plus haut sommet de l'état et dont les responsables doivent être mis à nu devant tout le monde; avant que cette atmosphère particulièrement nauséabonde ne découle sur un conflit ouvert.

Quand on vous arrête, qu'on vous conduise dans une cellule insalubre, qu'on vous agresse physiquement à coup de gifles ponctuées d’insultes en vous demandant si vous appartenez à une certaine ethnie, pouvez vous, chers lecteurs, continuer de croire en l'unité nationale telle que représentée et garantie par la protection que vous êtes sensée recevoir des ces mêmes forces de l'ordre? Ce blog pense que non! Finalement, que veut-on au Gabon? Vers quoi veut-on pousser les gens? Pourquoi veut-on forcer certains gabonais à observer la plus grande discrétion quand à leurs revendications légitimes? Pourquoi tient-on à convaincre certains gabonais de baisser la tête, raser les murs, se faire transparents, prêter attention aux mots qu’ils prononcent? Pourquoi les mêmes qui nous disent à longueur de dithyrambes que l'unité nationale est leur plus grand héritage, font tout pour la détruire? Vers quoi ceux qui ont une mainmise hégémonique et sans partage sur tous les pouvoirs au Gabon: politique, économique, militaire, culturel et médiatique, veulent-ils conduire ce pays?

Ainsi va le Gabon et courage à nos valeureux étudiants qui sont en train de nous donner une leçon d'opiniâtreté et de civisme.




















































Comments

Popular posts from this blog

THE ASCENSION OF NOUREDDINE BONGO AT THE HEAD OF GABON. L’ASCENSION DE NOUREDDINE BONGO À LA TÊTE DU GABON

WHAT IS GOING ON IN GABON? (3) QUE SE PASSE-T-IL AU GABON ? (3)